‘Geomantic’ figures as fourth dimensional vectors

The fourth dimension is an abstract concept derived by generalizing the rules of three-dimensional space.  It has been studied by mathematicians and philosophers for almost two hundred years, both for its own interest and for the insights it offered into mathematics and related fields.

The figures are generated by applying the rules of vectors and coordinate geometry to a space with four dimensions.  A vector with four elements, such as the geomantic figures, can be used to represent a position in four-dimensional space.

EDWARD BULWER LYTTON (1803-73) … geomancer

Edward Bulwer Lytton, the novelist, was a serious student of geomancy, carefully studying earlier works on the subject in an attempt to build geomancy into an overall philosophical and magical system.  Bulwer Lytton, best known as the author of a number of historical romances and occult novels, was a successful playwright and a politician who rose to be Secretary for the Colonies.

His marriage in 1827 against his mother’s wishes resulted in the withdrawal of his allowance and the subsequent need to write to support himself and his wife.  In 1838, two years after separation from his wife, he was created a baronet.  Greater financial freedom gave him time to study the medieval and Renaissance writers on divination and magic.  His novels increasingly reflected his interest in these subjects.

During his life, his novels dealing with the supernatural were dismissed as aberrations that would soon be forgotten. Today his occult works such as Zanoni, A Strange Story, Zicci and Last days of Pompeii are as well known, if not better known than his other works.

His favourite method of divination was geomancy, combining this method with astrology. He wrote a long prediction of the career of Disraeli, which proved to be amazingly accurate, and drew up horoscopes for various personal friends.

Amongst the books of his library was a well-thumbed copy of The Geomancie of Master Christopher Cattan published by John Wolfe in 1591, together with John Heydon’s Theomagia.

Diviners

Diviners are considered specialists who move from the boundless to the bounded.  They excel in insight, imagination and developed intuition.  During a divination they construct usable knowledge through linking diverse domains of representational information and symbolism.  It is the correct combination of inductive procedure and developed intuition that characterizes a good diviner.

During the act of divination, the diviner’s individual creativity operates, jumbled with ideas, metaphors and symbols suggesting various possible interpretations.  Through the interaction of the client, these slowly give way to an ordered sequencing and to more limited interpretations.

Rational forms of Divining.

The ancient Greek divinatory term Oionistic (from oio “thinking”, nous “understanding”, and hist “enquiry”) refers to the inductive art of the sane, those who inquire using the facility of human reasoning.  Many inductive or rational forms of divination have been compared with western scientific techniques.

Diviners are considered specialists who move from the boundless to the bounded.  They excel in insight, imagination and developed intuition.  During a divination they construct usable knowledge through linking diverse domains of representational information and symbolism.  It is the correct combination of inductive procedure and developed intuition that characterizes a good diviner.

The diviner’s individual creativity operates, jumbled with ideas, metaphors and symbols suggesting various possible interpretations.  Through the interaction of the client, these slowly give way to an ordered sequencing and to more limited interpretations, a technique not dissimilar to the psychoanalytical practice of free-floating attention.

Holy Art Thou

Holy art Thou, O God, the universal’s Father.

Holy art Thou, O God, whose Will perfects itself by means of its own Powers.

Holy art Thou, O God, who willeth to be known and art known by Thine own.

Holy art Thou, who didst by Word (Logos) make to consist the things that are.

Holy art Thou, of whom All-nature hath been made an image.

Holy art Thou, whose Form Nature hath never made.

Holy art Thou, more powerful than all power.

Holy art Thou, transcending all pre-eminence.

Holy Thou art, Thou better than all praise.

Accept my reason’s offering pure, from soul and heart for aye stretched up to Thee, O Thou unutterable, unspeakable, Whose Name naught but the Silence can express.

The Corpus Hermeticum